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Fishing Reports

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Yellowstone National Park Rivers - September 15th, 2011
  • Recorded:
  • Partly cloudy
  • 65 ° F 
  • Fishing: Good
Feels like? Fall-   Maybe, just maybe this could be the beginning of 'normal' fall like weather for us.  In the Park, it sounds like a bit of a broken record, but  the Northeast corner of the park still reigns tops for consistent fishing opportunities. Things are changing, however, with the cooler weather, places like the Firehole, Gibbon, and Madison in the Park are going to start to pick up again.  Water temps will be cooling off and fish becoming more active.  Still hard to go wrong though with one of the Top 3: Lamar, Soda Butte or Slough Creek. And as we've said it all season so far-  the Park is a very popular place to fish -lots of dudes (& dudettes) are out there wanting to be out on the water.  Go early and have good hiking shoes if you absolutely have to be by yourself.  Don't mind a few peeps around?  Have at it at any of the well distinguished (read crowded) pull-outs.

Firehole- water temps beginning to shape up(by that we mean down...) and fishing is starting to become respectable again.  Look for caddis and baetis mayfly patterns as well as terrestrials to be your go-to choices.

Gibbon river- Haven't actually had a report back on the Gibbon specific, but since the Firehole is cooling and fishing pretty well, it stands to reason that the Gibbon is as well.  Perhaps in addition to terrrestrial bugs, maybe some fall drakes are beginning to show...

Madison in the Park-  Did get a report back that the Maddy is OK.  Quite a few peeps out trying, but there's not much in the way of Lake Run fish coming in just yet.  Still a ways away for the bad boys of fall.  

Upper Gardner river- fishing well on all acounts.  Great brook trout fishing on small dry flies.  Keep it simple here! Classic patterns like parachute adams, royal wulffs, elk hair caddis all are working. It's not that tough.  Going under?  Hare's Ear, PT, prince are about all you need.  Keep an eye out for bears- pretty good concentration of griz in the area.  You should have bear spray and not be fishing alone.  Make a ruckus as you hike in and let the bears know you are around.

Gardner river-  Happy fishermen along the Gardner river from Lava Crk to its entrance into the Yellowstone river mainstem. Goldenstones, caddis, and terrestrials are what to toss.  Hopper/dropper rigs or anything resembling your favorite dry followed by a BH nymph of choice will get the job done.

Lamar river-  Dry fly fishing reigning supreme.  When doesn't it?  Why would you fish by other means here?  Fishing pressure still (& likely always will be-) concentrated at the easiest of pullouts up and down the valley.  Want relative peace and quiet?  Start Hiking!  Drakes,   Mr Terrestrial - that's Hopper to you-OK and Mr. Ant or Ms. Beetle is what to have on the end of your tippet.Look for Mstr Baetis to be in the mix as well.

Soda Butte Creek- See Lamar....

Slough Creek-  Did we say tough? Lots of folks love this place and the fish are not dumb.  Don't hesitate to go small (itty-bitty!) on flies or your tippet.  If you like a challenge, sight casting to rising fish is a blast and Slough Creek Cuttys are one of the epitomies of 'gettin it done' in the Park.

Stop by the shop on your way to the Park for licenses, flies, and gear.  Or feel free to call for up-to-the-minute reports 406-333-4401.

 
Yellowstone National Park Rivers - September 3rd, 2011
  • Recorded:
  • Sunny
  • 87 ° F 
  • Fishing: Good
What else but- The Northeast corner of the park is where it's at for consistent fishing opportunities. The Lamar and Soda Butte are doing very well. Slough Creek is good too, but fish here are getting really tough. Dry fly fishing in the Park is good to great.  Nymphing in the AM sometimes has been the way to get a bend in the rod and may increase through the rest of the fall as the days (hopefully) get cooler.  We've said it all season so far-  It's summer in the Park and lots of dudes (& dudettes) are out there wanting to be out on the water.  Go early and have good hiking shoes if you absolutely have to be by yourself.  Don't mind a few peeps around?  Have at it at any of the well distinguished (read crowded) pull-outs.

Firehole- time to lay off and seek cooler water elsewhere

Gibbon river- Stay above the falls for decent fish concentrations.

Upper Gardner river- fishing well on all acounts.  Great brook trout fishing on small dry flies.  Keep it simple here! Classic patterns like parachute adams, royal wulffs, elk hair caddis all are working. It's not that tough.  Going under?  Hare's Ear, PT, prince are about all you need.  Keep an eye out for bears- pretty good concentration of griz in the area.  You should have bear spray and not be fishing alone.  Make a ruckus as you hike in and let the bears know you are around.

Gardner river-  Happy fishermen along the Gardner river from Lava Crk to its entrance into the Yellowstone river mainstem. Goldenstones, caddis, and terrestrials are what to toss.  Hopper/dropper rigs or anything resembling your favorite dry followed by a BH nymph of choice will get the job done.

Lamar river-  Dry fly fishing is awesome right now.   Fishing pressure still (& likely always will be-) concentrated at the easiest of pullouts up and down the valley.  Want relative peace and quiet?  Start Hiking!  Goldenstones, Caddis, Drakes,  as well as Mr Terrestrial - that's Hopper to you- is what to have on the end of your tippet.

Soda Butte Creek- See Lamar....

Slough Creek-  Getting tough! Lots of folks love this place and the fish are not dumb.  Don't hesitate to go small (itty-bitty!) on flies or your tippet.  If you like a challenge, sight casting to rising fish is a blast and Slough Creek Cuttys are one of the epitomies of 'gettin it done' in the Park.

Stop by the shop on your way to the Park for licenses, flies, and gear.  Or feel free to call for up-to-the-minute reports 406-333-4401.

 
Yellowstone National Park Rivers - August 22nd, 2011
  • Recorded:
  • Mostly sunny
  • 80 ° F 
  • Fishing: Good
Still reigning as the place to be- The Northeast corner of the park is where it's at for consistent fishing opportunities. The Lamar and Soda Butte, & Slough Creek are all good bets. Best action has been on top water selections. However, you will no have the place to yourself.  It's summer in the Park and lots of dudes (& dudettes) are out there wanting the same thing as you!  Go early and have good hiking shoes if you absolutely have to be by yourself.  Don't mind a few peeps around?  Have at it at any of the well distinguished (read crowded) pull-outs.

Firehole- time to lay off and seek cooler water elsewhere

Gibbon river- Stay above the falls for decent fish concentrations.

Upper Gardner river- fishing well on all acounts.  Great brook trout fishing on small dry flies.  Fun classic patterns like rat faced McDougals (remember that??) parachute adams, royal wulffs, elk hair caddis all are working.  Keep it simple here!  it's not that tough.  Smaller streams in the area like Indian Crk, Panther Crk, Winter Crk have also been a lot of fun.

Gardner river-  Good water conditions are responsible for happy fishermen along the Gardner river from Lava Crk to its entrance into the Yellowstone river mainstem. Goldenstones, caddis, and terrestrials are what to toss.  Hopper/dropper rigs or anything resembling your favorite dry followed by a BH nymph of choice will get the job done.

Lamar river-  Dry fly fishing is awesome right now.  You can now wade across the Lamar to get to far reaching places that just a little while ago you couldn't. The entire valley is now fair game.  Fishing pressure still (& likely always will be-) concentrated at the easiest of pullouts up and down the valley.  Want relative peace and quiet?  Start Hiking!  Goldenstones, Caddis, Drakes, as well as a few remnant PMD mayflies are what to expect.  Hopper and other terrestrial fishing is definitely gaining momentum.

Soda Butte Creek- Soda Butte is coming into prime shape right now. Bugs are hatching and trout are eating. The usual array of terrestrials along with some drakes and PMDs should get the job done.

Slough Creek-  Game On! The dry fly fishing has come into its own and is definitely the preferred means . If you can't get them to look up, hit them in the face with the usual array of small nymphs and hold on. Lots of folks love this place and the fish are not dumb.  Don't hesitate to go small on flies or your tippet.  If you like a challenge, sight casting to rising fish is a blast and Slough Creek Cuttys are one of the epitomies of 'gettin it done' in the Park.

Stop by the shop on your way to the Park for licenses, flies, and gear.  Or feel free to call for up-to-the-minute reports 406-333-4401.

 
Yellowstone National Park Rivers - August 8th, 2011
  • Recorded:
  • Sunny, with thunderstorms
  • 78 ° F 
  • Fishing: Great
Long story short - The Northeast corner of the park is where it's at for great fishing opportunities. The Lamar and Soda Butte, though still high, are fishing very well. Slough Creek is strong. The dry fly game is full on fun.  And....you won't be alone.  Lots of dudes out there wanting the same thing as you!  Go early and have good hiking shoes if you absolutely have to be by yourself.  Don't mind a few peeps around?  Have at it at any of the well distinguished (read crowded) pull-outs.

Firehole- time to lay off and seek cooler water elsewhere

Gibbon river- fair to middling from word back.  Early game or end of day/late evening.  Basic but small sized attractors like para adams, royal wulffs, trudes, elk hair caddis and the like as well as full complement of terrrestrials should get it done for you.  Stay above the falls for decent fish concentrations.

Upper Gardner river- fishing well on all acounts.  Great brook trout fishing on small dry flies.  Fun classic patterns like rat faced McDougals (remember that??) parachute adams, royal wulffs, elk hair caddis all are working.  Keep it simple here!  it's not that tough.  Smaller streams in the area like Indian Crk, Panther Crk, Winter Crk have also been a lot of fun.

Gardner river-  Good water conditions are responsible for happy fishermen along the Gardner river from Lava Crk to its entrance into the Yellowstone river mainstem. Goldenstones, caddis, and terrestrials are what to toss.  Hopper/dropper rigs or anything resembling your favorite dry followed by a BH nymph of choice will get the job done. The Gardner has been a busy place so like other Park choices, get there early, plan to hike for the better holes.

Lamar river-  flows are definitely continuing to drop here and dry fly fishing is whowing great signs of happening.  River still has considerable volume compared to what it should have for this time of summer.  You still can't wade across the Lamar just willy nilly or every place you want to.  However, you can access just about the entire valley so some fishing pressure is beginning to disperse.  Goldenstones, Caddis, some drakes, as well as some PMD mayflies are what to expect.  Hopper and other terrestrial fishing is picking up as well.

Soda Butte Creek- Soda Butte is coming into prime shape right now. Bugs are hatching and trout are eating. The usual array of terrestrials along with some drakes and PMDs should get the job done.

Slough Creek-  Game On! The dry fly fishing has come into its own and is definitely the preferred means . If you can't get them to look up, hit them in the face with the usual array of small nymphs and hold on. Lots of folks love this place and the fish are not dumb.  Don't hesitate to go small on flies or your tippet.  If you like a challenge, sight casting to rising fish is a blast and Slough Creek Cuttys are one of the epitomies of 'gettin it done' in the Park.

Stop by the shop on your way to the Park for licenses, flies, and gear.  Or feel free to call for up-to-the-minute reports 406-333-4401.

 
Yellowstone National Park Rivers - July 31st, 2011
  • Recorded:
  • Sunny
  • 91 ° F 
  • Fishing: Great
Long story short - Things in the Northeast corner of the park are looking better every single day. The Lamar and Soda Butte, though still high, are fishing very well. Slough Creek is dropping and clearing. The dry fly game up there isn't up to speed but the fish are absolutely catchable subsurface if they won't eat your foamie.

Firehole- time to lay off and seek cooler water elsewhere

Gibbon river- You should really only consider fishing the Gibbon early in the morning. The flows are tiny and the water is warming up VERY quickly when the sun comes up.

Upper Gardner river- definitely shaped up and fishing well from what we have heard.  Great brook trout fishing on small dry flies.  Fun classic patterns like rat faced McDougals (remember that??) parachute adams, royal wulffs, elk hair caddis all are working.  Keep it simple here!  it's not that tough.  Smaller streams in the area like Indian Crk, Panther Crk, Winter Crk have also been a lot of fun.

Gardner river-  Good water conditions are responsible for happy fishermen along the Gardner river from Lava Crk to its entrance into the Yellowstone river mainstem.  While salmonflies are pretty well wrapped up, goldenstones, yellow sallies, and PMDs as well as caddis are still very much in the play.  Grasshoppers and other terrestrials are also a hit and will be from now through Sept.

Lamar river-  flows are definitely continuing to drop here and fishing is beginning to show signs of happening.  River still has considerable volume compared to what it should have for this time in July.  You still can't wade across the Lamar in a majority of places.  But reports are starting to come in that there fish to be caught.  Lots of bug activity as well.  Salmonflies, goldenstones, yellow sallies, green drakes, PMDs, and caddis are all coming off in good numbers.

Soda Butte Creek- Soda Butte is coming into prime shape right now. Bugs are hatching and trout are eating. The usual array of terrestrials along with some drakes and PMDs should get the job done.

Slough Creek-  The creek is totally fishable now. The reports we've heard as of late is that its 90% there. The dry fly fishing hasn't come into its own yet but people have definitely been picking up fish on the surface. If you can't get them to look up, hit them in the face with the usual array of nymphs and hold on. Also, since the Lamar and Soda Butte are in primo condition, there will be a good number of anglers on these two streams. Slough might be a good way to escape some of the pressue.

Stop by the shop on your way to the Park for licenses, flies, and gear.  Or feel free to call for up-to-the-minute reports 406-333-4401.

 
Yellowstone National Park Rivers - July 28th, 2011
  • Recorded:
  • Mostly sunny
  • 75 ° F 
  • Fishing: Good
Look for fishing to continue to improve over the coming days in the Park.  More and more rivers are starting to come into their own as the days go by.  Granted its late July and things are pretty much a month behind.  Still, this next month if not all the rest of the days till it starts snowing in earnest around here again should be really really good!

Firehole- time to lay off and seek cooler water elsewhere

Gibbon river- is decent to good.  Staying above the falls definitely helps things out.  The lower river will come back around come middle Sept.  In the meadows fish are tough, but a well laid small dry fly on light tippet along with some good timing and luck should pay off. Small emergent mayfly patterns, olive or rusty spinners, ants, beetles, as well as spruce moths are all good ideas right now.

Upper Gardner river- definitely shaped up and fishing well from what we have heard.  Great brook trout fishing on small dry flies.  Fun classic patterns like rat faced McDougals (remember that??) parachute adams, royal wulffs, elk hair caddis all are working.  Keep it simple here!  it's not that tough.  Smaller streams in the area like Indian Crk, Panther Crk, Winter Crk have also been a lot of fun.

Gardner river-  Good water conditions are responsible for happy fishermen along the Gardner river from Lava Crk to its entrance into the Yellowstone river mainstem.  While salmonflies are pretty well wrapped up, goldenstones, yellow sallies, and PMDs as well as caddis are still very much in the play.  Grasshoppers and other terrestrials are also a hit and will be from now through Sept.

Lamar river-  flows are definitely continuing to drop here and fishing is beginning to show signs of happeing.  River still has considerable volume compared to what it should have for this time in July.  You still can't wade across the Lamar in a majority of places.  But reports are starting to come in that there fish to be caught.  Lots of bug activity as well.  Salmonflies, goldenstones, yellow sallies, green drakes, PMDs, and caddis are all coming off in good numbers.

Soda Butte Creek- nothing definitive on the creek just yet, but if the Lamar is starting to turn the corner and come on, Soda Butte will surely be right there with it.

Slough Creek-  definitely dropping to a very fishable level and good clarity.  We've had a few reports on Slough with some decent and other reports that were pretty sour.  This one may still be a few more days away from really turning on.

Stop by the shop on your way to the Park for licenses, flies, and gear.  Or feel free to call for up-to-the-minute reports 406-333-4401.